Author: Brenda Hastings

Year in Review: 2014 Blog Highlights

I enjoyed sharing the happenings of my farm and family this year. Here are some highlights from 2014:

Six Most Popular New Blog Posts in 2014
1. Cow’s Milk vs Non-Dairy Imitation Milk posted April 1, 2014     
Comparing naturally superior cow’s milk to non-dairy imitations.
2. Why are calves separated from their mothers? posted January 14, 2014    
Explaining how calves are raised on our farm.  
3. It’s National Agriculture Day! posted March 25, 2014   
A look at agriculture’s far-reaching impact in all of our lives.

Chumey and Jack
4. The manure is deep in Farmed and Dangerous posted February 24, 2014  
Me and other farmers sharing thoughts on Chipotle’s silly fiction Farmed and Dangerous.
5. Farmland: The Movie posted April 22, 2014    
My review of this documentary which follows six young farmers and their families through the joys and challenges of production agriculture.
Lad, Garrett and Jack with some friendly heifers
The facts about milk quality and safety.

 

Me and Lad in the milking parlor

My 3 Favorite Blog Posts this Year
Sharing the progress of constructing our on-farm milk bottling creamery.
Pictures of me, my husband and our parents showing cattle at the county fair throughout the generations.
Garrett and Lad with Vanessa before going into the show ring
Featuring the great team at our farm with the animals they care for.
To see pictures highlighting 2014, check out A Look Back at 2014 on the Farm.

I hope you’ll visit my blog in 2015!
Me walking through a barn on our farm

Year in Review: 2014 Blog Highlights

I enjoyed sharing the happenings of my farm and family this year. Here are some highlights from 2014:

Six Most Popular New Blog Posts in 2014
1. Cow’s Milk vs Non-Dairy Imitation Milk posted April 1, 2014     
Comparing naturally superior cow’s milk to non-dairy imitations.
2. Why are calves separated from their mothers? posted January 14, 2014    
Explaining how calves are raised on our farm.  
3. It’s National Agriculture Day! posted March 25, 2014   
A look at agriculture’s far-reaching impact in all of our lives.

Chumey and Jack
4. The manure is deep in Farmed and Dangerous posted February 24, 2014  
Me and other farmers sharing thoughts on Chipotle’s silly fiction Farmed and Dangerous.
5. Farmland: The Movie posted April 22, 2014    
My review of this documentary which follows six young farmers and their families through the joys and challenges of production agriculture.
Lad, Garrett and Jack with some friendly heifers
The facts about milk quality and safety.

 

Me and Lad in the milking parlor

My 3 Favorite Blog Posts this Year
Sharing the progress of constructing our on-farm milk bottling creamery.
Pictures of me, my husband and our parents showing cattle at the county fair throughout the generations.
Garrett and Lad with Vanessa before going into the show ring
Featuring the great team at our farm with the animals they care for.
To see pictures highlighting 2014, check out A Look Back at 2014 on the Farm.

I hope you’ll visit my blog in 2015!
Me walking through a barn on our farm

Year in Review: 2014 Blog Highlights

I enjoyed sharing the happenings of my farm and family this year. Here are some highlights from 2014:

Six Most Popular New Blog Posts in 2014
1. Cow’s Milk vs Non-Dairy Imitation Milk posted April 1, 2014     
Comparing naturally superior cow’s milk to non-dairy imitations.
2. Why are calves separated from their mothers? posted January 14, 2014    
Explaining how calves are raised on our farm.  
3. It’s National Agriculture Day! posted March 25, 2014   
A look at agriculture’s far-reaching impact in all of our lives.

Chumey and Jack
4. The manure is deep in Farmed and Dangerous posted February 24, 2014  
Me and other farmers sharing thoughts on Chipotle’s silly fiction Farmed and Dangerous.
5. Farmland: The Movie posted April 22, 2014    
My review of this documentary which follows six young farmers and their families through the joys and challenges of production agriculture.
Lad, Garrett and Jack with some friendly heifers
The facts about milk quality and safety.

 

Me and Lad in the milking parlor

My 3 Favorite Blog Posts this Year
Sharing the progress of constructing our on-farm milk bottling creamery.
Pictures of me, my husband and our parents showing cattle at the county fair throughout the generations.
Garrett and Lad with Vanessa before going into the show ring
Featuring the great team at our farm with the animals they care for.
To see pictures highlighting 2014, check out A Look Back at 2014 on the Farm.

I hope you’ll visit my blog in 2015!
Me walking through a barn on our farm

A Look Back at 2014 on the Farm

As 2014 comes to an end, I’d like to reflect on the milestones, activities, and day-to-day farm happenings by reviewing pictures I captured throughout the year.The Polar Vortex: The year started with one of the coldest winter’s we’ve experienced.The sn…

A Look Back at 2014 on the Farm

As 2014 comes to an end, I’d like to reflect on the milestones, activities, and day-to-day farm happenings by reviewing pictures I captured throughout the year.The Polar Vortex: The year started with one of the coldest winter’s we’ve experienced.The sn…

Calf with a broken leg

Calves are born on our farm daily. They usually get up and start walking around within an hour after birth. But that wasn’t the case with a heifer calf born a few days ago. Shortly after she entered the world, it appears her mother accidently stepped on her back leg breaking it.

She needed medical attention, so Lad, Josue and Marco got to work helping this calf. An injury like this is rare on our farm. A splint was made, then the leg was set with the cloth-lined pipe splint before being bound with hoof wrap.

She’s a tough, strong calf

The calf was treated with anti-inflammatory and penicillin for the pain and swelling. She’s doing well and currently resting in the soft, cozy straw bed inside her hutch.

In a week, the splint will be taken off to check the leg. Then the dressing and splint will be re-applied.

She’s protected from the wind and cold
Everything is being done to help her leg heal so she recovers and becomes a healthy heifer.
 

Calf with a broken leg

Calves are born on our farm daily. They usually get up and start walking around within an hour after birth. But that wasn’t the case with a heifer calf born a few days ago. Shortly after she entered the world, it appears her mother accidently stepped on her back leg breaking it.

She needed medical attention, so Lad, Josue and Marco got to work helping this calf. An injury like this is rare on our farm. A splint was made, then the leg was set with the cloth-lined pipe splint before being bound with hoof wrap.

She’s a tough, strong calf

The calf was treated with anti-inflammatory and penicillin for the pain and swelling. She’s doing well and currently resting in the soft, cozy straw bed inside her hutch.

In a week, the splint will be taken off to check the leg. Then the dressing and splint will be re-applied.

She’s protected from the wind and cold
Everything is being done to help her leg heal so she recovers and becomes a healthy heifer.
 

First Snow of the Winter

We live in the snowbelt of Northeast Ohio, so expect cold and snowy winters. The question isn’t if snow will come, it’s when and how much. As a native Californian, I always hope for short and mild winters. We recently had the first snow of the season l…

First Snow of the Winter

We live in the snowbelt of Northeast Ohio, so expect cold and snowy winters. The question isn’t if snow will come, it’s when and how much. As a native Californian, I always hope for short and mild winters. We recently had the first snow of the season l…

Farm Animal Treatment & the See It? Stop It! Program

A dairy farmer’s job is to take care of animals. Everything that happens on our farm is centered on doing what’s best to maintain comfortable, healthy and productive animals.

We are fortunate to have a great team at our farm who like taking care of animals. Each day they milk the cows, deliver feed to their pens, make sure the animals have clean water troughs filled with fresh water, clean manure out of the pens, bring in clean bedding, treat sick animals, and whatever else is necessary for the herd.

Josue with a favorite heifer, Penelope
Andres carefully prepares the cows to be milked
Gregorio mixing fresh feed to deliver to the cows
Marco brings buckets of milk to the calves
Dave fixing the barn door to keep the cold air out this winter
Taylor with one of his favorite girls, Lorena #6616

 It’s inconceivable to most people that anyone would intentionally hurt an animal. Especially when your job is to take care of them. Our cattle depend on us to do what’s right. It’s important for us, and everyone charged with caring for livestock, to take their responsibility seriously. 

Unfortunately, a negative video pops up every once in a while displaying poor treatment of livestock. These videos are disturbing and difficult to watch. They are used by some organizations to convince people that the abuse depicted is normal behavior by farmers. It’s not.
I recently attended a national dairy meeting where I learned that 30% of the millennial generation (about 80 million people born between 1980 and 1995) believe farm animals are mistreated. This statistic disturbs me. Why do such a large number of young people in this country believe we fall short when it comes to livestock care?
Could it be this generation, well versed in YouTube, Twitter, Instagram and other social media, have seen videos depicting poor livestock treatment? Do they think this is common behavior? It isn’t.
One way we display our commitment to good animal care, is implementing the See It? Stop It! Program on our farm. This program is based on the principle that giving caretaker’s responsibility to report animal abuse assures the best animal care. Everyone on our farm is committed to providing the best care possible for the animals.

Good animal care has been happening on farms for generations. Long before the See It! Stop It! Program was created. But in today’s world, people seem to want a written, tangible assurance that farmers are doing the right thing. Programs and paperwork are not a substitute for setting an example and making sure good people are part of our team.

The people at our farm create a great environment for the animals