Livestock

First Snow of the Winter

We live in the snowbelt of Northeast Ohio, so expect cold and snowy winters. The question isn’t if snow will come, it’s when and how much. As a native Californian, I always hope for short and mild winters. We recently had the first snow of the season l…

First Snow of the Winter

We live in the snowbelt of Northeast Ohio, so expect cold and snowy winters. The question isn’t if snow will come, it’s when and how much. As a native Californian, I always hope for short and mild winters. We recently had the first snow of the season l…

Farm Animal Treatment & the See It? Stop It! Program

A dairy farmer’s job is to take care of animals. Everything that happens on our farm is centered on doing what’s best to maintain comfortable, healthy and productive animals.

We are fortunate to have a great team at our farm who like taking care of animals. Each day they milk the cows, deliver feed to their pens, make sure the animals have clean water troughs filled with fresh water, clean manure out of the pens, bring in clean bedding, treat sick animals, and whatever else is necessary for the herd.

Josue with a favorite heifer, Penelope
Andres carefully prepares the cows to be milked
Gregorio mixing fresh feed to deliver to the cows
Marco brings buckets of milk to the calves
Dave fixing the barn door to keep the cold air out this winter
Taylor with one of his favorite girls, Lorena #6616

 It’s inconceivable to most people that anyone would intentionally hurt an animal. Especially when your job is to take care of them. Our cattle depend on us to do what’s right. It’s important for us, and everyone charged with caring for livestock, to take their responsibility seriously. 

Unfortunately, a negative video pops up every once in a while displaying poor treatment of livestock. These videos are disturbing and difficult to watch. They are used by some organizations to convince people that the abuse depicted is normal behavior by farmers. It’s not.
I recently attended a national dairy meeting where I learned that 30% of the millennial generation (about 80 million people born between 1980 and 1995) believe farm animals are mistreated. This statistic disturbs me. Why do such a large number of young people in this country believe we fall short when it comes to livestock care?
Could it be this generation, well versed in YouTube, Twitter, Instagram and other social media, have seen videos depicting poor livestock treatment? Do they think this is common behavior? It isn’t.
One way we display our commitment to good animal care, is implementing the See It? Stop It! Program on our farm. This program is based on the principle that giving caretaker’s responsibility to report animal abuse assures the best animal care. Everyone on our farm is committed to providing the best care possible for the animals.

Good animal care has been happening on farms for generations. Long before the See It! Stop It! Program was created. But in today’s world, people seem to want a written, tangible assurance that farmers are doing the right thing. Programs and paperwork are not a substitute for setting an example and making sure good people are part of our team.

The people at our farm create a great environment for the animals

Farm Animal Treatment & the See It? Stop It! Program

A dairy farmer’s job is to take care of animals. Everything that happens on our farm is centered on doing what’s best to maintain comfortable, healthy and productive animals.

We are fortunate to have a great team at our farm who like taking care of animals. Each day they milk the cows, deliver feed to their pens, make sure the animals have clean water troughs filled with fresh water, clean manure out of the pens, bring in clean bedding, treat sick animals, and whatever else is necessary for the herd.

Josue with a favorite heifer, Penelope
Andres carefully prepares the cows to be milked
Gregorio mixing fresh feed to deliver to the cows
Marco brings buckets of milk to the calves
Dave fixing the barn door to keep the cold air out this winter
Taylor with one of his favorite girls, Lorena #6616

 It’s inconceivable to most people that anyone would intentionally hurt an animal. Especially when your job is to take care of them. Our cattle depend on us to do what’s right. It’s important for us, and everyone charged with caring for livestock, to take their responsibility seriously. 

Unfortunately, a negative video pops up every once in a while displaying poor treatment of livestock. These videos are disturbing and difficult to watch. They are used by some organizations to convince people that the abuse depicted is normal behavior by farmers. It’s not.
I recently attended a national dairy meeting where I learned that 30% of the millennial generation (about 80 million people born between 1980 and 1995) believe farm animals are mistreated. This statistic disturbs me. Why do such a large number of young people in this country believe we fall short when it comes to livestock care?
Could it be this generation, well versed in YouTube, Twitter, Instagram and other social media, have seen videos depicting poor livestock treatment? Do they think this is common behavior? It isn’t.
One way we display our commitment to good animal care, is implementing the See It? Stop It! Program on our farm. This program is based on the principle that giving caretaker’s responsibility to report animal abuse assures the best animal care. Everyone on our farm is committed to providing the best care possible for the animals.

Good animal care has been happening on farms for generations. Long before the See It! Stop It! Program was created. But in today’s world, people seem to want a written, tangible assurance that farmers are doing the right thing. Programs and paperwork are not a substitute for setting an example and making sure good people are part of our team.

The people at our farm create a great environment for the animals

Mystery Solved

Every Monday we welcome our daughter Kirsti to blog from her home in Western North Dakota’s oil patch. Take it away Kirsti.My husband had to look twice when he drove past this trail crossing sign. Was that what he thought it was?He got out to investiga…

Mystery Solved

Every Monday we welcome our daughter Kirsti to blog from her home in Western North Dakota’s oil patch. Take it away Kirsti.My husband had to look twice when he drove past this trail crossing sign. Was that what he thought it was?He got out to investiga…