Livestock

Dry Spring Days = Perfect Farming Conditions

The last week has been dry and warm which is great weather for farming. This spring has been wet in Northeast Ohio, so there hasn’t been much field work happening until about a week ago.

When the weather provides a window of opportunity, it’s necessary to spend longer hours than normal at the farm. Over the last week, many hours have been spent mowing & raking rye grass, hauling manure, plowing, disking, cultimulching, repairing equipment, and planting corn.


Taylor rakes rye grass that will be baled and fed to the cows and heifers
Lad plowing where the rye grass was harvested
Jack checking the mounds of freshly plowed soil
Plowing another field
My boys, Jack and Garrett, playing in the grass lining the fields


Josue disking
Lad, Taylor and Josue repairing the disk
Jack watches the men work
The disk is fixed and back in the field


Taylor cultimulching
The cultimulcher is a finishing tool used just prior to planting
Thanks to fellow motorists who are understanding of farm equipment on the road
Lad planting our first field of corn for the season!
Lad and Jack check for the corn seed as my Dad waits for the report

Lad measures the depth the corn seeds being planted
Planting corn
My dedicated, hard working husband Lad

Thanks to Taylor, Josue and Dave who work long hours daily to make sure the crops get in the ground. Also to my dad, Tony, who helps keep all the equipment working. Growing good crops is vital to provide our cows with the feed they need to thrive.

If Food Waste Is Decreased Is It a Bad Thing?

I often see criticism of agriculture in that the amount of food that goes to feed livestock could feed people. I see criticism for using food waste to feed livestock. And if it’s “wrong” I wonder what the solution is? Most of the feed we use for livestock is something humans can’t eat. Forages, for […]

A Ride in the Hackamore

Dino isn’t the first horse I’ve ridden or put into the hackamore. There have been many photos posted here of my horse Gump (Dino’s older half brother) in the hackamore, but Dino is by far the softest horse I’ve gotten ready for the next progression in making a bridle horse. Last week we drifted heifer […]

Instagrams Around the Ranch

I haven’t been posting here as much as I’d like, but that doesn’t mean the action has stopped! This morning, I thought I’d share some of the fun I’ve captured via my iPhone. Enjoy! Oh and don’t forget to enter my contest! The print is on its way to me as we speak! This is […]

Help! My Hen Crowed!

Any time one messes with animals there are always those who don’t read the books of how things are supposed to be. Sometimes that causes alarm when facing with something – like raising a hen that crows. Common knowledge is that roosters crow, hens cluck, right? Some roosters crow easily and at odd things, like […]

Is Milk Safe? How do I Know it’s Free of Antibiotics?

Did you know none of the milk in the grocery store, conventional or organic, contains antibiotics? Regardless if milk is labeled as being free of antibiotics or not. All milk is tested for antibiotics and discarded if it tests positive. Of the 3.19 million loads of raw milk delivered to processing plants across the country in 2013, only 445, or 0.014%, tested positive for antibiotics. This milk was dumped and never reached the grocery store shelf.

 
In this video, I share how dairy farmers keep antibiotics out of milk;
 

In my experience, milk safety and quality systems in the U.S. work. Milk quality begins at the farm, but is carried through all the people responsible along the way including the person who hauls milk from the farm to the processor and the processor who prepares the product for retail sale.
 
Here’s what fellow dairy farmers, a veterinarian and a dietician have to say about milk safety;
 
Milk Testing…If it’s not perfect, we pitch it! By Shannon Siefert, Minnesota Dairy Farmer
“I bet you didn’t know that each dairy farmer is required to keep ANY cows treated with antibiotics separate from the other cows that are not treated with antibiotics. The milk from all treat cows is usually disposed of and does not enter the human food supply. If it’s not perfect, we pitch it, every time, everyday!”
 
Antibiotics in my Milk? by Dairy Moos Blog, California Dairy Farmer
“I can say confidently that there are no antibiotics in any milk because it’s illegal for antibiotics to be in the milk.”
 
Cows, Antibiotics, and You by Will Gilmer, Alabama Dairy Farmer
“When antibiotics are deemed necessary for the sake of an animal’s health, we have a process that allows us to help the cow while protecting the safety and integrity of the milk that leaves our farm.”

Veterinarians, Farmers Have Shared Goal of Producing Safe Milk Supply
From coast to coast, dairy veterinarians around the nation feel similarly about using antibiotics responsibly. Chick here to watch how veterinarian, Dr. Richard Veeman, cares for cows in Oregon. 
 
Food for Thought – A Perpetual Post by Melissa Joy Dobbinson, Registered Dietitian
 
Click here for a great resource that shares brief videos with answers to common questions about milk safety. 
 
I want to assure you U.S. dairy products are safe. They are among the most highly regulated and tested products on the store shelf today. You can feel good about serving milk and dairy products to your family!
 

Is Milk Safe? How do I Know it’s Free of Antibiotics?

Did you know none of the milk in the grocery store, conventional or organic, contains antibiotics? Regardless if milk is labeled as being free of antibiotics or not. All milk is tested for antibiotics and discarded if it tests positive. Of the 3.19 million loads of raw milk delivered to processing plants across the country in 2013, only 445, or 0.014%, tested positive for antibiotics. This milk was dumped and never reached the grocery store shelf.

 
In this video, I share how dairy farmers keep antibiotics out of milk;
 

In my experience, milk safety and quality systems in the U.S. work. Milk quality begins at the farm, but is carried through all the people responsible along the way including the person who hauls milk from the farm to the processor and the processor who prepares the product for retail sale.
 
Here’s what fellow dairy farmers, a veterinarian and a dietician have to say about milk safety;
 
Milk Testing…If it’s not perfect, we pitch it! By Shannon Siefert, Minnesota Dairy Farmer
“I bet you didn’t know that each dairy farmer is required to keep ANY cows treated with antibiotics separate from the other cows that are not treated with antibiotics. The milk from all treat cows is usually disposed of and does not enter the human food supply. If it’s not perfect, we pitch it, every time, everyday!”
 
Antibiotics in my Milk? by Dairy Moos Blog, California Dairy Farmer
“I can say confidently that there are no antibiotics in any milk because it’s illegal for antibiotics to be in the milk.”
 
Cows, Antibiotics, and You by Will Gilmer, Alabama Dairy Farmer
“When antibiotics are deemed necessary for the sake of an animal’s health, we have a process that allows us to help the cow while protecting the safety and integrity of the milk that leaves our farm.”

Veterinarians, Farmers Have Shared Goal of Producing Safe Milk Supply
From coast to coast, dairy veterinarians around the nation feel similarly about using antibiotics responsibly. Chick here to watch how veterinarian, Dr. Richard Veeman, cares for cows in Oregon. 
 
Food for Thought – A Perpetual Post by Melissa Joy Dobbinson, Registered Dietitian
 
Click here for a great resource that shares brief videos with answers to common questions about milk safety. 
 
I want to assure you U.S. dairy products are safe. They are among the most highly regulated and tested products on the store shelf today. You can feel good about serving milk and dairy products to your family!
 

Tuesday’s Tales – Ellie The Calf

I’m pretty sure Spring is in full swing. The wild onions are sprouting. The Meadowlarks call to one another. There are ducks everywhere (including our calving corral this morning), and the world is turning an emerald shade of green. There’s been plenty of wind, it’s currently raining, and there’s muddy gumbo everywhere here in Armstrong. […]

Buckskin and Blue

I think it’s time for a giveaway! It’s been a while, and since we’re calving, and don’t have time to share the stories (and there are a few already), this will be the next best thing, right? A couple weeks ago, I shared this photo on Facebook and everyone loved it. Then I shared it […]

Calves, cows, horses, wind…

In case anyone is wondering, I’m still alive. Though sometimes I’m not sure how awake I am! We have started calving in earnest – which means all night heifer checks for me, morning runs through the cows, afternoon rides through the heifers and heifer pairs, afternoons of drifting heifer pairs to summer pasture and of […]