Livestock

Farmland: The Movie

Today is Earth Day, a day to reflect on our impact on the environment around us. Farmers are caretakers of many acres of land in this country, so its appropriate to focus on farmers during Earth Day. Are you interested in learning more about how farmers care for their land and animals? If so, watch Farmland: The Movie.

I recently had the opportunity to watch Farmland: The Movie. This documentary follows six young farmers and their families exposing the joys and challenges of production agriculture. It was good to see the diversity of the farmers featured; small, large, conventional and organic and from all corners of the U.S.

  
As I watched, I found myself relating to these farm families when they spoke about the risks farmers face, how dependent we are on the weather, that it’s necessary to work long hours to get crops into the ground, and the commitment we have to animal care. It displayed how generations of family members are involved in the farm. And how we in production agriculture are at the mercy of factors beyond our control; the weather, the price paid for our finished product, input costs and government policy/regulations.
One scene that particularly moved me was during Christmas when a little boy opened his present, a toy combine. He was thrilled to have a piece of equipment like Dad uses. This young man dreams of becoming a farmer. The father of this boy shared his hopes and reservations about his son entering production agriculture. This experienced farmer has seen good times and bad. He’s seen some years of profitability and times when he almost lost everything. That’s the reality of farming.
As a dairy farmer’s daughter with children who may become dairy farmers someday, I can relate to the mixed emotions parents feel when thinking about their children following in their footsteps. On one hand, there are rewards and satisfaction with this occupation and lifestyle. On the other hand, there is a lot of risk, long hours, and many challenges. 
This film accurately portrays farm families. If you’re looking for true stories about food production, I encourage you to watch this movie. It will be in select theaters May 1st. Soon after that, on DVD and Netflix.
Follow on Farmland on Facebook 

Check out another review of the movie “Farmland documentary shows the truth: Farming is not easy” written by Susan Crowell, Editor, Farm & Dairy Newspaper.
 

Cuteness Overload Warning!

Yep it’s that time of year. Be it calves, lambs, foals, kids…it’s the time of year when cute baby animals show up in social media streams of all kinds. And – well it is Easter, and among the symbols of Easter is the rabbit. I’m a bit partial…so took a break on the crowdsourcing push […]

Lynn Reardon from Lope Texas on Buck Brannaman

Man am I excited! I’ve been Facebook friends with Lynn for years, and have followed her on Twitter as well. When I was in Kiowa last year, I got to meet her and visit for a while. Ambitious, kind, smart and of course, a horse lover, she runs LOPE – Lonestar Outreach to place Ex-Racehorses. […]

Tuesday’s Tales – The Thumpin’

By: VeNecia DeCluette – Ve is one of my dear friends, and has been a big cheerleader for me for many years! I just love her. I’m hoping to convince her to write some more guest pieces for us in the future, because, well, she’s got a way with words!  This story was originally published […]

It’s National Agriculture Day!

It’s National Agriculture Day! I’m celebrating because dairy farming has been a way of life for me and my family for generations. My husband and I are glad to be raising our boys on a farm. But agriculture doesn’t only impact farm families, it’s far reaching touching everyone’s life.

Today is a great opportunity to reflect on how agriculture makes a positive impact in our lives; 
Food quality & choice – there is a larger variety of quality food in the store today than ever before
Fiber – plants, like cotton, and animals, like sheep, goats, and alpacas, produce wonderful fibers
By-products – many household items, medicine and other goods contain plant and animal products
Open space – large flat fields, small rolling fields, barns and tractors create beautiful landscapes 
Economic impact – farmers purchase lots of products and services which support local businesses
Strong community – farms are the backbone of viable rural communities 

This is one of my favorite photos of my sons, Garrett and Jack, and my husband, Lad

As dairy farmers, we are interested in making improvements that benefit the animals we care for and the land we grow crops on. Part of working smart is utilizing technology and other tools available to do a better job producing food using fewer resources.


My 2013 National Ag Day blog post shared theEvolution of Dairy Farming featuring improvements dairy farmers have made over the years. It includes thoughts from my father, Tony Souza, and my father-in-law, Duane Hastings, both dairy farmers who have experienced many changes in dairy farming over the years.

Dairy farming is a unique and challenging business. In order to sustain farming and the food choices people enjoy today, it’s necessary to embrace farmers of all types and sizes. Successful farms producing quality food can be large, small, organic, or conventional. Healthy animals can be fed a variety of feed stuffs and be housed inside or outside. It’s ok if we adopt different practices. The goal for all farmers is caring for land and animals to produce quality products people want to consume. After all, we live on our farms and eat the food produced here!

National Ag Day is the perfect time to celebrate the food quality and choices we enjoy in this country. Thanks to farmers who work hard every day and to consumers who support what we do!

It’s National Agriculture Day!

It’s National Agriculture Day! I’m celebrating because dairy farming has been a way of life for me and my family for generations. My husband and I are glad to be raising our boys on a farm. But agriculture doesn’t only impact farm families, it’s far reaching touching everyone’s life.

Today is a great opportunity to reflect on how agriculture makes a positive impact in our lives; 
Food quality & choice – there is a larger variety of quality food in the store today than ever before
Fiber – plants, like cotton, and animals, like sheep, goats, and alpacas, produce wonderful fibers
By-products – many household items, medicine and other goods contain plant and animal products
Open space – large flat fields, small rolling fields, barns and tractors create beautiful landscapes 
Economic impact – farmers purchase lots of products and services which support local businesses
Strong community – farms are the backbone of viable rural communities 

This is one of my favorite photos of my sons, Garrett and Jack, and my husband, Lad

As dairy farmers, we are interested in making improvements that benefit the animals we care for and the land we grow crops on. Part of working smart is utilizing technology and other tools available to do a better job producing food using fewer resources.


My 2013 National Ag Day blog post shared theEvolution of Dairy Farming featuring improvements dairy farmers have made over the years. It includes thoughts from my father, Tony Souza, and my father-in-law, Duane Hastings, both dairy farmers who have experienced many changes in dairy farming over the years.

Dairy farming is a unique and challenging business. In order to sustain farming and the food choices people enjoy today, it’s necessary to embrace farmers of all types and sizes. Successful farms producing quality food can be large, small, organic, or conventional. Healthy animals can be fed a variety of feed stuffs and be housed inside or outside. It’s ok if we adopt different practices. The goal for all farmers is caring for land and animals to produce quality products people want to consume. After all, we live on our farms and eat the food produced here!

National Ag Day is the perfect time to celebrate the food quality and choices we enjoy in this country. Thanks to farmers who work hard every day and to consumers who support what we do!

The Colt Cam Chronicle

This week as I rode, I realized a couple things: 1. despite my work at becoming more ambidextrous I’m still very right side dominant. 2. which means that it matters not which horse I ride, I really get in their way when it comes to them getting the right lead. And by the right lead, […]

Throwback Thursday

I loved, loved, loved this horse.  He was the first horse I ever trained that could have taken me places if I’d had the money to go down the road on him.  He was N.I.C.E. Same run every time. And you could ride him like you stole him to the first barrel. EVERY run.  He’d […]