Father of Agriculture

I feel it is only fitting that I begin my first blogging adventure after celebrating father’s day. If it were not for my father, I would likely not be involved in agriculture. For four generations now my family has been involved in agriculture, and I received a first class education of the industry in no better place than the front seat of the farm truck. It was in that seat that I learned the most important aspects of agriculture: soil composition, crop varieties, equipment, weather, and the all important policy. I took to this lifestyle and continued to thrive as I grew up traveling across the country and engaging in as many Ag related activities that came my way.

These new opportunities opened perspectives to various different issues I could have never imagined from my small home town. I began to realize how consumers of ag products are much like the commodities they consume; not all grow in the same “soil type”, some consumers are a “leafier” variety while others prefer a more hearty protein. There are consumers who prefer a more natural and organic experience when it comes to the goods they consume, as well as those who may or may not pick a political stance on agricultural issues that come across their ballot.

As was mentioned in a recent post on this site, agriculture is diversifying. This has never been more evident than the responses I received as I sought advice on what consumers would like to read about on the ag issues front. The issues that came up were the increasing price of groceries in relation to the economy, involving agriculture more closely in school curriculums, using “real” or natural ingredients as a trend or permanent staple, local supplies of meat, vegetables, and fish, and agricultures future impact on the fuel industry. It is clear to see that consumers all have a direct concern with their agriculture no matter their background or personal preferences on what they purchase at the grocery store. I hope to touch on many of these topics as I continue on my journey through exploring the agricultural industry.

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